The Matrix Revolutions


The Matrix Revolutions

Overview:

The human city of Zion defends itself against the massive invasion of the machines as Neo fights to end the war at another front while also opposing the rogue Agent Smith.

Votes 3058 (6.4/10)

Runtime: 129 minutes

Release Date 2003-11-05

Budget: $150,000,000.00

Revenue: $424,988,211.00

Tagline: Everything that has a beginning has an end.

Production company:

  • Village Roadshow Pictures
  • NPV Entertainment
  • Silver Pictures
  • Warner Bros.

Production country:

  • United States of America
  • Australia

Genres:

  • Adventure
  • Action
  • Thriller
  • Science Fiction

Trailer

Further Information

Thomas "Neo" Anderson
Keanu Reeves
Keanu Reeves
Morpheus
Laurence Fishburne
Laurence Fishburne
Trinity
Carrie-Anne Moss
Carrie-Anne Moss
Agent Smith
Hugo Weaving
Hugo Weaving
Oracle
Mary Alice
Mary Alice
The Architect
Helmut Bakaitis
Helmut Bakaitis
The Merovingian
Lambert Wilson
Lambert Wilson
Captain Ballard
Roy Jones Jr.
Roy Jones Jr.
The Keymaker
Randall Duk Kim
Randall Duk Kim
Commander Lock
Harry Lennix
Harry Lennix
Agent Thompson
Matt McColm
Matt McColm
Link
Harold Perrineau
Harold Perrineau
Niobe
Jada Pinkett Smith
Jada Pinkett Smith
Cas
Gina Torres
Gina Torres
Seraph
Collin Chou
Collin Chou
Councillor West
Cornel West
Cornel West
Zee
Nona Gaye
Nona Gaye
Persephone
Monica Bellucci
Monica Bellucci
Tower Soldier
Maurice Morgan
Maurice Morgan
Rama-Kandra
Bernard White
Bernard White
Bane
Ian Bliss
Ian Bliss
The Trainman
Bruce Spence
Bruce Spence
Director
Lilly Wachowski
Lilly Wachowski
Screenplay
Lilly Wachowski
Lilly Wachowski
Director
Lana Wachowski
Lana Wachowski
Screenplay
Lana Wachowski
Lana Wachowski
Producer
Joel Silver
Joel Silver
Original Music Composer
Don Davis
Don Davis
Director of Photography
Bill Pope
Bill Pope
Editor
Zach Staenberg
Zach Staenberg
Casting
Mali Finn
Mali Finn
Casting
Shauna Wolifson
Shauna Wolifson
Production Design
Owen Paterson
Owen Paterson
Art Direction
Jules Cook
Jules Cook
Art Direction
Catherine Mansill
Catherine Mansill
Art Direction
Charlie Revai
Charlie Revai
Set Decoration
Brian Dusting
Brian Dusting
Costume Design
Kym Barrett
Kym Barrett
Makeup Artist
Maggie Fung
Maggie Fung
Art Direction
Hugh Bateup
Hugh Bateup
Sound Designer
Richard Adrian
Richard Adrian
Special Effects
Steve Courtley
Steve Courtley
Visual Effects
Deb Asch
Deb Asch
Stunts
Ray Anthony
Ray Anthony
Stunts
Glenn Boswell
Glenn Boswell
Animation
Chuck Duke
Chuck Duke
Assistant Director
James McTeigue
James McTeigue

NeoBrowser

And so the much-hyped Year Of The Matrix comes to an end. Truthfully, though, the real Year Of The Matrix was 1999, when the groundbreaking original proved to be the right film in the right place at the right time. Tapping into the cultural zeitgeist and Y2K fears about the power of machines over mankind, The Matrix not only revitalized slo-mo action sequences with its 'bullet-time' style, it had a political relevance that already seems dated in a 21st century world dominated by a war against terror, not technology. The Matrix Reloaded, for all its faults, did try to up the ante, both in its creation of a wider Matrix myth and its budget-heavy effects. Revolutions, however, is content to follow in its wake, the final couple of hours of a four-and-a-half hour slab to which the original movie, in the makers' minds, is but a pre-title sequence. Granted, there's less philosophical babble and more emphasis on action in Revolutions, but the Wachowskis, having backed themselves into pseud's corner, can only deliver with a formula where spectacle and pretentiousness follow on from each other in steady succession. Gut thrills and intellectual stimulation are never integrated as one. Revolutions' sustained action set-piece - the Sentinels' attack on Zion - is undeniably exciting, but it sure doesn't feel like an episode from a close sequel to the original Matrix. For a start, Zion was off-screen for the entire first movie. Secondly - and dramatically more importantly - this centerpiece relegates the main characters to, at best, mere bystanders. Neo and Trinity are off on a mission of their own. Morpheus - now dressed in what looks like a burgundy Benetton jumper rather an outfit consistent with his standing as the coolest dude on (or under) the planet - takes a literal backseat to Niobe's driving. Instead, the key players are the Kid, whose backstory is apparent only to those dedicated enough to watch The Animatrix cartoons, and Mifune, whose on-screen impact is unfortunately as brief as it is memorable. That such a primary scene is completely filled with secondary characters isn't just disappointing - it's damaging, because it draws attention away from the protagonists' climactic acts. Basically, this is the bit you remember, more than Neo's vital conversation with the Wizard Of Oz-like face of the machines or his up-in-the-air fisticuffs with Smith (a fight whose sfx impact has dwindled following Reloaded's Burly Brawl). Some viewers will indeed be completely satisfied, their questions answered, as the final credits roll, but they're the ones who have done their homework. Without filling in plot gaps by watching The Animatrix or playing derided computer game Enter The Matrix, a sense of confusion reigns. And those who are confused can't emotionally engage with the characters, thus rendering any amount of sacrifices and love themes null and void. In the original film, the casual viewer could relate to a slave race of pod people and their need to be freed, but the Wachowskis seem to have moved the goalposts as the story has progressed, sidelining what began as a focal point of the plot. In other words, few box-office-storming blockbusters have been aimed so consciously at such a narrow and precise cult audience. The Year Of The Matrix will be remembered as an indulgence for fans, while the original movie will be affectionately held as a separate entity by a bigger crowd. Verdict - What once represented the future of science fiction cinema has become little more than a solid genre offering. But, hey, it wasn't supposed to be the Second Coming, was it? Oh, hang on... 3/5 - Empire Magazine

The Matrix Reloaded
The Matrix Reloaded
Votes 3362 (6.7/10)
Release Date 5/15/2003

Details »

Mad Max: Fury Road
Mad Max: Fury Road
Votes 9289 (7.2/10)
Release Date 5/13/2015

Details »

The Matrix
The Matrix
Votes 8806 (7.9/10)
Release Date 3/30/1999

Details »

I, Robot
I, Robot
Votes 3664 (6.7/10)
Release Date 7/15/2004

Details »

A Scanner Darkly
A Scanner Darkly
Votes 527 (6.8/10)
Release Date 5/25/2006

Details »

Cloud Atlas
Cloud Atlas
Votes 2917 (6.6/10)
Release Date 10/26/2012

Details »

Minority Report
Minority Report
Votes 2538 (7.1/10)
Release Date 6/20/2002

Details »

Interstellar
Interstellar
Votes 10592 (8.1/10)
Release Date 11/5/2014

Details »

In Time
In Time
Votes 3316 (6.7/10)
Release Date 10/27/2011

Details »

Automata
Automata
Votes 663 (5.6/10)
Release Date 10/9/2014

Details »

Logan
Logan
Votes 5856 (7.5/10)
Release Date 2/28/2017

Details »

Kung Fu Panda 3
Kung Fu Panda 3
Votes 1574 (6.7/10)
Release Date 1/23/2016

Details »

Terminator Genisys
Terminator Genisys
Votes 3551 (5.8/10)
Release Date 6/23/2015

Details »

RoboCop
RoboCop
Votes 2301 (5.7/10)
Release Date 1/30/2014

Details »

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire
The Hunger Games: Catching Fire
Votes 6324 (7.4/10)
Release Date 11/15/2013

Details »

Wonder Woman
Wonder Woman
Votes 4317 (7.2/10)
Release Date 5/30/2017

Details »

Children of Men
Children of Men
Votes 2026 (7.4/10)
Release Date 9/22/2006

Details »

Strange Days
Strange Days
Votes 322 (6.8/10)
Release Date 10/13/1995

Details »

Cloverfield
Cloverfield
Votes 2192 (6.4/10)
Release Date 1/15/2008

Details »

Gods of Egypt
Gods of Egypt
Votes 1237 (5.2/10)
Release Date 2/25/2016

Details »